Posts Tagged ‘ABOUT WOMEN’


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Work must go on. Life must go on. This then is life.

The world celebrate woman’s day today, Happy Mother’s Day!

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Hello all you marvelous people!

We are currently at the 47 hour mark. Just shy of two full days to go! Amazingly we only have 7.5% more to go!! We are extremely pleased that we are now so close to our goal! We could never have gotten this far without the support and pledges of all our wonderful backers. So for each and every one of you, on behalf of the production, our forebears and our generations to come, THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH!!

We feel that you are all now part of this production and together, I have faith that we can make this happen. The journey may be ending but the glorious light at the end of the tunnel is just within reach! We need just that little push left to close the gap between almost making our goal and successfully meeting it. And honestly people, I think we can do it!

I know it may be a lot to ask of all of you who have steadfastly stood by us, believed in us, believed in our story and more importantly believed in the possibility of heralding a difference to situations in Sabah by way of a simple tale, but we are passionate about this project and we hope that you have been infected by that same passion that courses through our veins. So please, if you have the funds to spare consider increasing your pledges just to get us through to reaching our target, and if you have yet to do so please support Di Ambang: Stateless in Sabah by pledging any amount to our Kickstarter campaign.

Here’s to making it happen!!!

Humbly grateful,

Azliana

See Here : http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1118390113/di-ambang-stateless-in-sabah/posts/717591

(AT THE TIME THIS UPDATE IS POSTED US$9410 HAD ALREADY BEEN PLEDGED BY BACKERS)


Hello everybody!

It’s here!! The final stretch for our Kickstarter campaign. There are only 7 more days to go before the campaign ends!! With still more than half way to go to reach our goal I implore you to rally those around you, friends, family, colleagues, somewhat friendly acquaintances, anybody you can get to please help support our film. We really want this film to reach an audience and to do that we need every single pledge we can get. The issue of stateless people in Sabah is one that directly affects Sabah’s socio-economic landscape and the growing population of stateless individuals is one of the bigger problems that has been plaguing Sabah. It is high-time this issue was addressed and awareness on the human implications of the situation cultivated.

As promised we have prepared a clip from the film that showcases the opinions of various knowledgeable sources on the dilemma. I hope you enjoy the video and you have not yet pledged please pledge any amount you can so we can get this film out to the public.

Many thanks,

Azliana

 

Di Ambang: Stateless in Sabah



Pope Francis may have been an unlikely successor to Pope Benedict XVI, but he is already emerging as a remarkable pontiff, one who has always led a simple life himself, who understands the kinds of lives led by many Roman Catholics, and who also knows the dangers of a remote clergy apparently more concerned with specific forms of orthodoxy than with the mission of providing a spiritual space for all of the faithful in our complex and troubled times.

That the Church of Rome faces serious problems is clear, with declining attendance and a shrinking priesthood, especially in developed countries, with widening rifts between followers’ attitudes in the developed and developing worlds, and with terrible scandals of child sex abuse, corruption, and incompetence which would have destroyed many a lesser institution. The Pope’s fellow priests probably know that very well, but the way His Holiness has responded to the situation is making the world sit up and take note.

In an interview with the Italian Jesuit magazine La Civiltà Cattolica, which has been translated and republished in the American Jesuit journal America, the pontiff says the Church is “the community of God’s people.” Therefore, one of its first tasks is to recognise “how human beings understand themselves today.”

The Pope had already made waves by replying to a question on gay priests, “Who am I to judge?” but now he has gone further, saying that the Church must not “interfere spiritually” in the lives of gays and lesbians and that priests must not be obsessed with homosexuality, abortion, and contraception to the neglect of their wider mission, which is to proclaim and spread the “saving love of God.” Even the way that is done could be radically reformed; Pope Francis says local doctrinal issues are best addressed by local bishops’ conferences, with the Vatican available for consultation.

Furthermore, the pontiff is clear about a stronger role for women: “the feminine genius is needed wherever we make important decisions.” Just as radically, on September 22, the Pope told 20,000 listeners in Sardinia that the world must abandon its “idolatry of greed” and reform the global financial system.

Significantly, the Pope has not proposed changing the church’s line on homosexuality, contraception, and abortion — or on women priests — but he has reminded all the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics that if they do not end their obsession with those issues and start acknowledging humanity as it is today, the Church’s moral edifice could fall “like a house of cards.” For Roman Catholicism, His Holiness may well be a truly world-historic figure.


Interview + Text Rathika Sheila + Ben Liew
Images Choen Lee @ Bunny+Bear Pictures
Venue Wondermama

They say fathers are closer to their daughters. Could it be or maybe it’s just that fathers put more pressure on themselves and their child when it comes to their firstborns. I spent my afternoon speaking to Marina Mahathir and Nurul Izzah Anwar about the relationships they shared with their fathers and their strangely normal upbringing. After spending 15 minutes chatting away about what CLIVE’s notorious Editor has been up to, and snacking on curry fries, I finally asked them the first question…

When was the last time you had dinner with your dad?
Marina Just the two of us? I think it was March 2011 in London. He wanted to bring his whole [entourage] but I said, “no, I cannot afford to pay.” We meet here in KL during family occasions. I met a young hairdresser in Singapore once and he told me he hasn’t been home for two years but he calls his mother every day. He said, “You cakap sekali sebulan, dia tak tahu apa nak cakap, tapi tiap-tiap hari you cakap 10 minit, dia happy.” I keep telling myself to do something similar but I don’t.
Nurul We don’t have one-to-one lunches because we’re a big family so usually my in-laws will join us. The recent one was along election week because throughout the campaign my sister in-law who works in the States was here, so that was about three weeks back. I don’t know what he’ll say to me when it’s one-to-one…
Marina Sometimes it’s better not to have the one-to-one [laughs].

Do your conversations around the dinner table revolve around work-talk mostly?
Marina What is work-talk?
Nurul That’s a good point. What is work? After a while, work, politics, daily life, it gets morphed into the personal because it’s engraved in you.
Marina Like anybody’s conversation, it goes all over the place. First you’re talking about your kids, then a little bit about politics and work.

What was the sternest action taken by your dad to discipline you?
Nurul My dad gives the evil eye. He just has to say “Izzah..” in his lowered tone of voice and I know I’m in trouble. My mum was more of a disciplinarian.
Marina I used to get spanked when I was little because I didn’t want to go to school.

Do you personally believe in “spare the rod and spoil the child”?
Marina I don’t agree with it. When you become a parent, you will understand why the temptation to whack them will come. It’s normal to think about whacking them but it’s not normal to actually do it.

Not even raise your hand to falsely threaten?
Marina Raise voice, yes, but not the hand. I remember when my older one was a little baby, I don’t know what she did but I smacked her lightly and my dad said, “Don’t touch my granddaughter!” And he’s the one that use to pinch me when I was little. I can’t do it, as tempting as it gets, I can’t.
Nurul I think it’s also what we went through as children. My parents didn’t do that, although my mum would threaten us with a ruler when she teaches my siblings and I, but I think right now we’re learning a lot from self-help books, “How to talk to children so they listen and how to listen so they talk to you”. This morning in fact, my son didn’t want to bathe so I had to draw and explain how the shower rod works and I was already late for work but after 10 minutes, he finally responded. I guess there are different techniques with different generations. I do believe now it has a lot to do with psychology – listening to them and trying to be their friend. Mind you, he’s four.
Marina I think this generational thing, it’s normal to change. I made a conscious decision that I wasn’t going to bring up my kids quite the same way as I was brought up. I think my husband and I are a bit more democratic with our children, which, of course, means the democracy bites back. But, on the other hand, my parents benefit from the way we bring up our children. Our children are more demonstrative, they’re not shy to say “I love you” and they [grandparents] benefit from it.

At this point in the interview, Nurul begins to share about the time her father sent her off to a local university for her first semester and kissed her on the cheek and forehead in public. “That’s not how I wanted to start my first semester in Uni!” she says, sounding like every other teenager. “He’s like that, he’ll hug and kiss us good night. It was different for us in that sense. Imagine going to Assunta Secondary School, the last thing you need is the Deputy Prime Minister to come and kiss you.” Marina also reminisces the times her father would visit her while she was studying in Tunku Kurshiah College and how stunned her classmates were when she held her father’s hand when they walked together. “It was normal for us to be that affectionate but I don’t think a lot of them shared the same relationship.”

READ MORE HERE


It is not illegal to have friends. It is not illegal to help a friend either. Every culture encourages that. Help can be transactional, where both sides simultaneously do things for each other. It can also be one-sided, with only one party doing the other a favour. That isn’t illegal and is common amongst friends.

Why then has the country come up in arms against Sharizat Abd Jalil? Why does it give people a sick-in-the-gut feeling when hearing about the National Feedlot Corporation’s RM250 million fiasco? Why are so many people angry over her family company buying luxury apartments, hotel stakes and land, offered as sweet deal from a friend called Pak Lah?

The Pakatan Rakyat has done a gutsy and commendable job in bringing these findings to the forefront. Sharizat’s husband Mohd Salleh Ismail shady dealings were common gossip in banking circles. The media knew it well too. However, it is the PKR strategy director Rafizi Ramli and Ampang MP Zuraida Kamaruddin that crystallized the outrage, presented some documents and made it a topic of household discussion.

PKR strategy director Rafizi Ramli’s move, led to an investigation by the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) on Wanita Umno chief Shahrizat Abdul Jalil however, the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) cleared her as it found “there was no case against her”. Demanding an independent investigation into Sharizat, is a disappointment. Firstly, a fair and independent investigation is nearly impossible in Malaysia against the Sharizat’s family, especially when they are in power and connected to UMNO. Second, and more important, even if a fair investigation is conducted, there may not be much illegality in what Sharizat’s husband did (ignoring the charges of criminal breach of trust and violations of the Companies Act, as alleged in some news reports). After all, Sharizat’s husband made a friend in business consultant Shamsulbahrin Ismail, and Shamsulbahrin Ismail was suppose to pay police officers at the Commercial Crimes Division in Bukit Perdana to close the case and help Sharizat’s husband out. That’s all the paper trail may reveal, despite exhaustive investigations. In fact, when powerful people help each other, they are smart enough to keep the paper trail sacrosanct. Expensive lawyers work hard to ensure the deals have a semblance of legality, whatever the intent.

In fact, proximity and access to UMNO are of huge value. If National Feedlot Corporation (NFCorp) seniors are seen hanging out with the Prime Minister then and his son-in-law, would not the Minister of Agriculture and the UMNO Menteri Besar of Negeri Sembilan view National Feedlot Corporation (NFCorp) many request, well, a little differently? Neither National Feedlot Corporation (NFCorp), nor the family, nor the Minister of Agriculture or the Negeri Sembilan government may ever sit down and spell out how each will help the other. They don’t need to, for they are friends. There’s nothing illegal about it, right?

In fact, this lack of, or hard to prove illegality is the cornerstone of the defence put forward by the UMNOs’ army of spokespersons and eager-beaver sycophants. ‘It’s a private matter’ or ‘prove give and take’ or ‘prove abuse of power’ are often the arguments given. It is hard to fault them completely, for the legal bases are probably well covered, or at least very difficult to prove otherwise.

And yet, what happened is ethically wrong. Politicians work for the benefit of common people, not for their family, not for their friends, business partners and relatives. At least that is the assumption people had about the Sharizat family. People also assumed that they believed in simplicity and were above personal greed, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. After all, what use is wearing simple baju kurung, implying simplicity, when your family members are accumulating hundreds of millions by exploiting political power?

There will be a huge price UMNO and Barisan Natinal will pay for this. Ethics may not matter in courts, but do matter in the hearts of people. A family that betrays trust will pay the price in the next election. It may even lose that trust forever.

However, the Sharizats are by no means alone in this. Nor is this just a UMNO issue. A large number of politicians have lost track of the idea that every profession in this world has ethics – it may not be illegal to break them but still is definitely wrong. A doctor must treat his patient as soon as possible, it is assumed, under ethical medical practice. But if he delays treatment, it would be hard to prove it illegal. A lecturer must try to teach his students well, though if he doesn’t, it won’t be illegal. Society needs ethics as much as laws to function well.

A politician should think a hundred times before forging business deals with people with whom there might be a future conflict of interest, and a million times before they accept any substantial favors. Favours usually oblige one to return them, and if that means hurting the interests of people that put you in that position, the effects can be devastating. Sharizat’s husband’s foolish greed, and the other family members’ tacit approval, has cost Sharizat her ministership. The cost will also be in terms of reputation and esteem. Wise people know these are priceless and far more valuable than anything quoted in ringgit.


(Datin Sri Rosmah Mansor, istri Perdana Menteri Malaysia Mohamad Najib bin Tun Haji Abdul Razak dituduh punya cincin berlian senilai 24 juta dollar AS)

DALAM sepekan terakhir terjadi saling serang dan pembelaan antara media kubu oposisi dan media pro-pemerintah terkait kepemilikan cincin berlian senilai 24 juta dollar AS (setara Rp 203 miliar) dengan Datin Sri Rosmah Mansor, istri Perdana Menteri Malaysia Mohamad Najib bin Tun Haji Abdul Razak.

Jumat (29/7), Datin Sri Rosmah Mansor muncul dan mengungkapkan bantahan di harian berbahasa Inggris, The Star, yang menyatakan tuduhan itu adalah fitnah dan tidak berdasar. Sejumlah foto pemberitahuan bea cukai (Kastam Malaysia) atas impor cincin berlian senilai lebih dari 24 juta dollar AS dari pialang berlian kelas dunia, Jacob and Co, di New York, AS, dan nama pengekspor atas nama Datin Sri Rosmah Mansor beredar luas di internet. Bantahan Datin Rosmah menghiasi halaman favorit di situs Thestaronline.com. Rosmah menduga ada pihak yang memanfaatkan namanya dikaitkan dengan cincin berlian yang harganya selangit itu.

Perusahaan Jacob and Co yang namanya dikaitkan dengan berlian ratusan miliar rupiah itu pun dikenal kontroversial. Penulis di situs Themalaysianinsider.com, Yow Hong Chieh, mencatat, Jacob Arabo, seorang Yahudi asal Uzbekistan, pemilik Jacob and Co, berulang kali ditangkap aparat karena diduga terlibat pencucian uang hasil kejahatan.

Kontroversi Datin Rosmah

Kehidupan Datin Sri Rosmah Mansor memang penuh kontroversi. Perusahaan Rosmah, Perimekar Sendirian Berhad (Sdn Bhd), diketahui Parlemen Malaysia menerima uang jasa 100 juta euro (sekitar Rp 1,2 triliun) atas pembelian kapal selam Scorpene buatan Perancis.

Pertengahan Juli, pengacara Perancis, William Bourdon, yang mewakili sejumlah aktivis pro-Demokrasi Malaysia, menggugat Perimekar Sdn Bhd atas dugaan suap dan korupsi dalam kasus kapal selam Scorpene. Ia ditahan imigrasi Malaysia, lalu dideportasi. Tindakan itu memicu protes dari penggiat hak asasi manusia di Malaysia, seperti lembaga Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram).

Kasus pembelian kapal selam Perancis, pesawat tempur jet Rusia, dan persenjataan lain diduga mengakibatkan pembunuhan model asal Mongolia, Altantuya Shaarribuu, bulan April 2006. Altantuya, putri seorang profesor di Ulan Bator, diketahui memiliki hubungan khusus dengan Abdul Razak Baginda, penasihat pribadi PM Najib Razak.

Altantuya yang fasih berbahasa Rusia dan sejumlah bahasa asing, menurut pihak oposisi, mengerti betul seluk-beluk pembelian senjata yang digunakan Angkatan Tentera Diraja Malaysia itu. Karena menuntut terlalu banyak, akhirnya ia ditembak mati, lalu tubuhnya diledakkan. Situs berita Singapura, Channelnewsasia.com, pada 9 April 2009 melaporkan, dua polisi, Azilah Hadri dan Sirul Azhar Umar, dijatuhi hukuman mati karena menjadi eksekutor Altantuya. Namun, auktor intelektualis dan dugaan korupsi pembelian senjata tidak pernah disidangkan hingga pihak oposisi Malaysia mengajukan gugatan di Pengadilan Paris, Perancis.

See the rest here

And see more here and here

 


After 19 days Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor finally denies she purchased the 24 million diamond ring. Perhaps she should also explain why her name appeared in the Custom Declaration Form! Perhaps she should also explain why she should examine the ring if she had no intention to buy. Anyway, it is not easy to access the Customs computer and fabricate the custom documents just to smear her name. Wonder who paid RM 242670.00 shipping cost and insurance  for the diamond ring to be sent all the way from New York to Kuala Lumpur by courier on a CIF basis.

See below her denial….

Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor has denied she had purchased a diamond ring worth over RM24 million, three weeks after the allegations surfaced in cyberspace.

The wife of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak dismissed the allegation that was raised by a blogger, calling it yet another lie to slander her.

Rosmah said she had ‘no time to address the allegation’. — File pic
“There is nothing I want to say because I have no time to address such things. Let (the blogger) say what he wants.

“This is slander but what have I not experienced? I have experienced it all. So, rather than address this, it is better I pay attention to public issues as these are more important,” she was quoted as saying by Berita Harian when accompanying her husband on his working trip to Kedah yesterday.

Screenshots of a Customs computer screen showed the ring, from New York celebrity jeweller Jacob and Co, was brought in under her name.

Rosmah has faced continuous allegations of a lavish lifestyle ever since it became apparent that Najib would succeed Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi as prime minister.

Attempts primarily by the opposition to embarrass the prime minister by attacking his wife have included ridiculing Rosmah’s videos that have appeared on her website and claims that the Prime Minister’s Office has a budget to run a first lady’s department.

A pro-Pakatan Rakyat (PR) blog called “Milo Suam” had claimed that the ring was sent to Rosmah in April.

The Customs screenshot also revealed that the ring did not have import duties imposed on it.

The allegation has since been spread online by Malaysians especially on pro-opposition blogs.

Pro-government bloggers have denied the allegations earlier, saying the diamond ring was in Malaysia for a private exhibition and was returned to the jeweller after four days.


This is our Rosmah Mansor’s RM24.4 million DIAMOND RING! Don’t ask me where she got the RM24,400,000 to pay for the Diamond ring? Got to ask Jibby that! Malaysia Serba Boleh!




Note : ROSMAH MANSOR’s Diamond Ring is actually US$24.4 MILLION and not Ringgit Malaysia. The Custom Declaration does say the exchange rate is US$1 to MR3.0573, and therefore, the actual value of the DIAMOND RING in Ringgit Malaysia is RM74,776,663.26. Yes RM74.8 MILLION. Sorry for the error.


It was a great experience watching in CNN how on that night in US, Obama became President-elect. That election energised people across the US – and the world. There was great hope and expectation. How I wish we could say the same about Malaysia’s leaders.

Here, there is an air of resignation, of politics as usual, like the gutter politics of sex videos. We need a leader who can energise us, whom we can relate to, and who embodies a vision for the New Malaysia. We need to get a large percentage of our citizens involved in the community process – which is what Obama managed to do.

So, who can be Malaysia’s Obama? I think we have elections happening in the next 6-odd months. We need change, but will probably not get it this time. The three choices this time are likely to be Najib Tun Razak (who has disappointed more than delighted), Anwar Ibrahim (let’s hope he governs as well as he talks), and a dark horse in Muhideen Yassin (also a total disappointment). I think we will have to wait a few more years before Malaysia’s Obama emerges.

What helped Obama was the Internet – in raising cash for the campaign and mobilizing millions of supporters across the country. In Malaysia, that change will come in 5-6 years although we saw something close to it in the 2008 elections with the mobile platform. But we also need leaders who can think big and put Malaysia first, but sad we don’t have that kind at this moment.

So, who will be Malaysia’s Obama? Any ideas? If I had to pick one person, it would be Nurul Izzah Anwar Ibrahim. She is young even younger than Obama, relatively young compared to the people we have now. She is liberal, hardworking and gone through baptism of fire when her dad was thrown in jail for sodomy and portrayed as the biggest sex maniac in Malaysia, all trumped up by the system. She survived all that shame and continued to be a good efficient Member of Parliament and to the people in her constituency. Mind you she is a women, a mother, a daughter and what shame she has been put through, and she still stands tall in spite of all the shit thrown at her father.

Obama used the electronic media effectively to build his brand and channelise the tremendous support for his message of hope and optimism. A few years down the line, we might have a large number of Internet subscribers but I seriously doubt that we will have a politician who can rise above the cesspool and generate the same kind of enthusiasm among common people.

Of course the two names I have mentioned the current PM, his Deputy, has been a massive disappointment. They maybe effective campaigners and communicators but they rely heavily on the same old strategy of divide and rule. In summary, our search for Obama is going to be a long and hard one.