Archive for the ‘World Wildlife Fund’ Category


Will Sukau Bridge 2 Project be Peter Anthony’s next Pot of Gold at the expense of Bornean Pygmy Elephants, Orangutans and Proboscis Monkeys?

Peter Anthony is looking into reviving the Sukau Bridge 2 Project.

Even World’s No 1 environmental icon Sir Richard Attenborough and international environmental NGOs were heavily critical of this project. Sir Attenborough had said that Sabah’s global appeal as an ecotourism will be doomed if the Sukau Bridge 2 Project went ahead.

The UK Guardian newspaper published an article highlighting Sir David Attenborough’s concerns over the proposed bridge that would span 350m across the Kinabatangan River, threatening one of the last sanctuaries of the rare Bornean pygmy elephant.

Musa Aman had scrapped this project. Looks like Musa is the only true defender of the environment. Musa’s track record in saving Sabah’s environment cannot be denied.

The Sukau Bridge Project is RM223mil and split into two phases.

Phase 1 is RM67 million and it involves an approach road followed by a bridge across the Kinabatangan at Sukau.

Phase 2 is RM150 million and it involves upgrading 0.3km of the IOI dirt road before constructing an ambitious 1.38km of elevated bridge featuring a raft of viaducts for animals to cross a forested Lot 3 of the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary in addition to upgrading 1km of dirt road till Kg Moresem.

What Peter Anthony is suggesting is a slap in the face of Shafie Apdal as only yesterday Shafie had issued a stern warning to businesses, that the protection of wildlife in Sabah is absolute, and no compromise on wildlife.

The Kinabatangan Conservation Area is described as “Sabah’s Gift to the Earth” and has been dubbed the “Corridor of Life”.

Lets see if WWF opposes this project again as they did it in the past. In the past, the WWF representative RAHIMATSAH was vehemently against the Sukau Bridge 2 Project but now I hear RAHIMATSAH was recently awarded a project in the Danum Valley and may choose to stay silent.

I also heard last year a couple of soldiers were caught for poaching wildlife in the Danum Valley and so far nothing has come out of it.


AT LONG LAST THE TIGER TEMPLE IS BEING SHUT DOWN.

Wildlife officials in Thailand recently began removing tigers from Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Buddhist temple that for years has faced allegations of animal abuse and illegal trafficking. Today, they discovered the remains of at least 40 tiger cubs inside a freezer. The temple, known colloquially as the Tiger Temple, is a popular tourist spot in Kanchanaburi province where visitors are allowed to play with tigers and bottle-feed cubs. Thai authorities plan to transport more than 130 tigers to sanctuaries elsewhere in the country.

Thailand has an estimated 1,200-1,300 captive tigers.


TUN MUSTAPHA MARINE PARK FINALLY GAZETTED; PROTECTED SABAH MARINE PARKS NOW TOTAL 2 MILLION HECTARES OF CORAL REEF, MANGROVE, SEA-GRASS AND PRODUCTIVE FISHING GROUNDS COVERING MORE THAN 50 ISLAND.

The State Government has officially gazetted 898,762.76 hectares in the northern seas of Sabah as the TUN MUSTAPHA MARINE PARK.The move comes after more than 13 years of preparatory work led by Sabah Parks with government agencies, local communities, international partners and with support from non-governmental organisation i.e WWF-Malaysia.

State Tourism, Culture and Environment Minister Datuk Masidi Manjun tweeted the new marine park, Thursday, as being the biggest in the country and the newest conservation initiative carried out by the State Government.


“Its done! Tun Mustapha Marine Park in northern Sabah is gazetted,” he said, accompanied by a photo of the state gazette dated May 19.

The park is located off Kudat, Kota Marudu and Pitas right up to the Straits of Balabac, where the Sulu Sea and South China Sea meet in the northern part of Sabah.

With the declaration, the size of protected marine parks in Sabah now stretches to about two million hectares.

“Efforts to gazette the park has been carried out through consultations with various parties with interest in the area,” he said.

The area covers 50 islands and includes the three main ones of Pulau Banggi, Pulau Balambangan and Pulau Malawali with more than 180,000 people living in the coastal areas and islands.

It was earlier reported that such a move was the only means of protecting sharks in the area due to the reluctance of the Federal Government to legislate a ban on shark hunting.

” The area is rich in various marine life and located within the coral triangle covering waters within Luzon Island in the Philippines, Bali in Indonesia and the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

” The triangle area has over 500 species of corals that is the habitat of numerous marine life. This includes 243 invertebrate species, 550 fish species, four species of turtles, dugongs, crocodiles and sharks,” he said.

As an open marine park, the Tun Mustapha Marine Park will be managed through a collaboration between various bodies involving both government and non-governmental organisations, as well as local communities, said Masidi.

Towards this end, he said the areas are divided into six zones, involving a conservation zone, community-use-zone, multi-use zone, commercial fishing zone, special fish management zone and aquaculture zone, adding that the park was gazetted under the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Category Six.

This involves protected areas being set up to conserve ecosystems and habitats, together with associated cultural values and traditional natural resource management systems.

The marine park was first proposed in 2000, with the State Government approving its establishment on March 5, 2003.

The gazetting of the park had undergone various stages like public hearings from 2012 to 2015 as well as public consultations on the park zoning from 2012 to 2013.

The framework of management plan was drafted in July 2012 and was completed along with its gazetting plans, with the government planning to launch the new marine park in June this year.

Tun Mustapha Park is evidence of Musa Aman’s commitment to the Coral Triangle Initiative and contribution towards meeting the Aichi Biodiversity Target of at least 10% marine areas protected and managed.


Two red pandas also known as lesser pandas, who were abandoned by their mother shortly after birth at a north China zoo are now healthy and content, thanks to their competent wet nurse: a mother dog.

The baby pandas were born at Taiyuan Zoo in Shanxi Province on June 25.

Their mother, the first red panda bred at the zoo, was taken in from a nature reserve in the northwestern Shaanxi Province at the end of April. No one knew she was pregnant. Her plump body and bushy hair disguised her protruding belly until the babies were born.

After the panda gave birth in its pen, in broad daylight and in front of a huge crowd of visitors, it abruptly turned its back on the babies and refused to nurse them. The zoo authorities hurriedly went about to find a wet nurse a mother dog which had given birth three days before the mother panda.

The mother dog was good-natured and has sufficient milk and the baby bears seem to like it.

Compared with the baby pandas that stayed with the mother dog every day, the puppy was more like an orphan.

The mother dog thinks the two bears are its own babies and refuses to nurse its own pup.

At three weeks old, the baby pandas are more than 20 cm long, “twice their birth length”. “They move around a bit but their eyes are still not open.” Lesser pandas are small, raccoon-like mammals that feed on bamboo and are native to the Himalayas. They are also known as “red pandas” because they have reddish brown fur on the body.

The average life expectancy of lesser pandas is about 13 years, and they reach adulthood at two years old.

The species is under special protection in China, though they are less known than giant pandas. They do not adapt easily to the environment. Official statistics indicate China’s lesser panda population has dropped by 40 percent since the 1950s because of human expansion into their natural habitats.


Lets for a change from the heavy politics do our small bit to save Mother Earth from the threats of global warming on March 28th.

Climate Change is undoubtedly and regrettably, the biggest immediate long-term environmental challenge we face. A failure to come to sound policy outcomes on climate change will not only have a negative environmental impact but also social and economic consequences for all of us.

Keen to do your bit to save Mother Earth? Join Nobel peace prize winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu, actor Aamir Khan among others to create awareness on climate change.

Over two million people across the world will switch off lights at their homes and offices for an hour at 8.30 p.m. on March 28 to kick-start the ‘Earth Hour’ campaign.

“Climate change is the greatest human induced crisis facing the world today. It is totally indiscriminate of race, culture and religion. It affects every human being on the planet,” Archbishop Tutu said in a statement here.

‘Earth Hour’ is a part of the World Wildlife Fund’s initiative that began in Sydney in 2007 as a one-city campaign when over two million people switched off their lights for an hour. In 2008, the campaign went global with over 50 million people in 371 cities, across 35 countries flicking the switch.

Stand up and join us in the fight against climate change. Support Earth Hour.