Archive for the ‘China’ Category


Coronavirus tests world’s dependence on China

Businesses like Starbucks, Ikea, Ford and Toyota are shutting down locations in China, and Apple is rerouting supply chains as the number of people infected by a mysterious flu-like virus passes 7,000.

It’s not clear how quickly these businesses will bounce back.

Tourism is also suffering. British Airways suspended all flights to the mainland, and United Airlines and Air Canada joined a growing number of carriers reducing service. In Sabah, AirAsia has stopped all KK-Wuhan flights till Feb. 29. Governments around the world are issuing travel warnings, including Malaysia.

China has been the world’s largest source of tourism dollars, but it appears unlikely that Chinese tourists will spend what they typically do — $258 billion annually, nearly twice the tally of Americans.

Sabah’s tourism in 2018 with tourism receipts at RM8.342bil was a record-high of 3.879 million arrivals. The top market source was China, with a total of 593,623 Chinese tourists visiting Sabah in 2018, averaged about 50,000 every month.

The Malaysian government temporary ban on residents from the Hubei province and its capital city of Wuhan from entering Malaysia will cost Sabah tourism to lose RM100 million a month based on estimated spending of RM2000 per Chinese tourist.

As of December 2018, direct flights from China to Kota Kinabalu International Airport (KKIA), totalled up to 125 flights per week.

The toll: China said that 170 people had died so far from the virus and more than 7000 cases had been confirmed, which is believed to have originated in Wuhan. There have been no reported deaths outside of China, but cases overseas have been rising.

Nearly 60 million people are under partial or full lockdowns in Chinese cities.

Answers: Bats are considered the probable source of the outbreak. They have an immune system that allows them to carry many viruses without getting sick.

How to stop it: Scientists in China, the U.S. and Australia are racing to develop a vaccine, a quest that could take months, if not years.


Hong Kong protests demands have changed. Unlikely to end soon.

Since the protests kicked off, the full withdrawal of the extradition bill has been one of the central objectives. This has been conceded. The bill has sparked weeks of violent unrest in the former British colony.

But the movement has swelled to encompass a growing list of demands, including an independent inquiry into perceived police brutality and direct elections for the city’s leaders. Direct elections will mean dilution of Beijing’s control with a government answerable to the electors.

Can Beijing afford this?

SEE THE REST BELOW…

Hong Kong Leader Withdraws Extradition Bill


By Alysha Haridasani Gupta in New York Times

As Hong Kong has been convulsed with protests, a cryptic exhortation is omnipresent: “Add oil!”

The phrase 加油 (ga yao) literally means adding fuel to a tank, but is used as a motivational cheer to push through, go faster, stay strong. It’s a fist-pumping, foot-stomping multipurpose chant that can be used in almost any situation. It’s the verbal equivalent of the muscular arm emoji.

“It’s also a way to encourage people to persevere through other sorts of difficulty,” Jennifer 8. Lee wrote for The Times during the Beijing Olympics in 2008. “It’s a way of expressing sympathy, support and solidarity that ‘Let’s go’ doesn’t quite capture.”

The historical record is spotty, but “add oil” is believed to have first been used at the Macau Grand Prix in the 1960s before seeping into Hong Kong slang. It was also widely used during the pro-democracy Umbrella Movement protests in 2014, and in 2018 “add oil” was added to the Oxford English Dictionary.

 


This tech cold war matters because it could slow down or dramatically alter the rollout of a technology that is likely to define the future of the Internet for the next decade–the 5G networks in which Huawei has all but cornered the market. The race to roll out 5G is the most consequential fight for global technological supremacy since the U.S. battled the Soviet Union to put a man on the moon. The winner will take home billions, if not trillions, in profits and gain a powerful seat at the table in creating the infrastructure for the next billion Internet users. And right now, it looks like the U.S. is losing.

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time.com

Dennis Honrud’s family has been farming wheat in eastern Montana for three generations. Unashamedly old school, Honrud sows only half his 6,000 acres, leaving the rest fallow to avoid soil depletion. “There’s not many of us left,” he laments. Like many workers in the global economy, the 68-year-old needs to stay connected, in his case to monitor crop prices and weather updates from his green John Deere tractor. So he asked a telecom provider to put a cell tower in his backyard.

The Honrud property in Glasgow, Mont., is so remote that it wasn’t well covered by any of the big four American carriers–Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint. So Honrud turned to the local provider, Nemont Wireless, to install the tower. Today, cell service is pretty good. When the occasional car accident happens on the stretch of highway next to the Honrud farm, highway patrol officers no longer need to drive a mile to get a signal. Now they can place a call from the scene. If that hasn’t saved a life yet, “at some point in time it will,” Honrud says.

Rest of story…

 


Jack Ma is a member of the Communist Party.

Mr. Ma, China’s richest man and the founder of the country’s biggest e-commerce company, Alibaba, was listed as a member of the Chinese Communist Party in its official newspaper. It might seem odd that a billionaire entrepreneur who made his wealth in the private sector belongs to an organization that propagates the ideals of Karl Marx. But Mr. Ma’s membership didn’t surprise many in China — and it “reveals a party that is eager to prove its legitimacy by affiliating itself with capitalist success stories,” writes NYT Asia tech columnist, Li Yuan

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HONG KONG — Jack Ma, China’s richest man and the guiding force behind its biggest e-commerce company, belongs to an elite club of power brokers, 89 million strong: the Chinese Communist Party.

The party’s official People’s Daily newspaper included Mr. Ma, executive chairman of the Alibaba Group and the country’s most prominent capitalist, in a list it published on Monday of 100 Chinese people who had made extraordinary contributions to the country’s development over the last 40 years. The entry for Mr. Ma identified him as a party member.

It may sound contradictory that the wealthy Mr. Ma belongs to an organization that got its start calling for the empowerment of the proletariat. But Mr. Ma’s political

CONTINUE HERE


After the last party congress in Beijing in October 2017, i predicted that President Xi Jinping will soon become an emperor. Well its happening now.

“China’s Communist Party cleared the way for President Xi Jinping to stay in power, perhaps indefinitely, by proposing that the nation’s Constitution be changed to abolish a two-term limit on the presidency.

The Communist Party Central Committee, a council of senior officials from the ruling party, “proposed to remove the expression that the President and Vice-President of the People’s Republic of China ‘shall serve no more than two consecutive terms’ from the country’s Constitution,” the Xinhua News Agency said on its English-language website.

Since each term is five years in length, the Constitution had limited Mr. Xi, who became president in 2013, to 10 years in office.”

China’s Communist Party has proposed revising the nation’s Constitution to end a two-term limit, which would allow Xi Jinping to remain president, perhaps indefinitely, by proposing that the nation’s Constitution be changed to abolish a two-term limit on the presidency.

SCAREMONGERING ABOUT CHINA

Posted: February 21, 2018 in China, Malaysia, USA
Tags: ,

Despite all the scaremongering going on within America’s security community, I dont believe China will be able to credibly challenge the USA, militarily, economically and politically for the rest of this century at least. I also dont believe that China will ever have the soft power or become aspirational like the USA. I don’t believe that the world’s many nations will hoard their foreign reserves in Yuan as opposed to US dollars (68%). I don’t believe that countries can ever become rich by posting trade surpluses with China as they have (including China) with the USA. I believe all this American scare mongering is driven by the lure of funding from the US military industrial complex. The US MI complex needs an arms race to keep going and to persuade the nation to cough up 7-8% of GDP for defense. The Chinese are too smart to engage the USA in any direct conflict because they know they will get whipped. Even Russia will be too formidable for them till at least 2050. China will reserve its aggressiveness for countries like India, Japan, or Vietnam. Remember the old Chinese saying about “skinning the cat to scare the monkey!” If  Malaysia is smart it will resist becoming the cat, till it gets really sharp talons.

Regardless of how America responds to the Chinese challenge, its policy must be rooted in reality.

Leaders of smaller, poorer countries are much more vulnerable to the ambitions of a country with deep pockets like China. After being thrown out of power, leaders in a number of countries have been investigated for accepting bribes from Chinese companies. The former president of Sri Lanka, Mahinda Rajapaksa, has been accused of accepting bribes from China Harbour Engineering Company, a subsidiary of state-owned China Communications Construction Company. Rajapaksa’s tenure saw several high-profile Chinese investments in Sri Lanka. Many of those, including an airport and a seaport in Hambantota—the home base of Rajapaksa—have proven to be commercial non-starters. In Nigeria, just three days before exiting office, former president Goodluck Jonathan approved an out-of-court settlement—now being probed by US agencies—between Addax Petroleum (owned by Chinese oil giant Sinopec) and the Nigerian National Petroleum Corp., saving the former millions of dollars.

In 2012, the husband of former Philippine president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo was arrested on charges of accepting bribes to push a deal between the Philippine government and the Chinese telecom company ZTE. Mohammad Nasheed, the leader-in-exile of Maldivian opposition, has accused President Abdulla Yameen of corruption in leasing out islands to foreign countries. India, too, was concerned about the Yameen government leasing out the Feydhoo Finolhu island to a Chinese company at a throwaway price without competitive bidding. Known for his proximity to China, Yameen again surprised New Delhi in November last year by passing a free trade agreement with China through the Maldivian parliament in an emergency session called at short notice with most of the opposition members unavailable to attend.

As China pushes its ambitious trillion-dollar Belt and Road Initiative, such sweetheart deals can be expected in greater numbers. India’s smaller neighbours are especially vulnerable, but New Delhi can do little as it cannot match Beijing’s largesse.

The scale at which China is using its capital for securing political influence is unprecedented

“Everyone in China is a slave,” Guo said in the video. “With the exception of the nobility.”

To those who believe Guo’s claims, they expose a depth of corruption that would surprise even the most jaded opponent of the C.P.C. “The corruption is on such a scale,” Ha Jin said. “Who could imagine that the czar of anti-corruption would himself be corrupt? It is extraordinary.”

From a penthouse on Central Park, Guo Wengui has exposed a phenomenal web of corruption in China’s ruling elite — if, that is, he’s telling the truth.

May 25, 2017― Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad lamented today over the sale of a 49.9 per cent stake in Malaysia’s national carmaker Proton, once the country’s source of pride, to Chinese automaker Zhejiang Geely Holding Group.

The former prime minister, who had founded Proton Holdings in 1983 in a bid to turn Malaysia into an industrialised powerhouse, said he could not be proud of Proton’s future success because it would no longer belong to him or to Malaysia.

“I am a sissy. I cry even if Malaysians are dry-eyed. My child is lost. And soon my country. Please excuse me,” Dr Mahathir wrote on his blog.

“Proton the child of my brain has been sold. It is probably the beginning of the great sell-out. The process is inexorable. No other way can we earn the billions to pay our debts. The only way is to sell our assets. And eventually we will lose our country, a great country no doubt, but owned by others,” added the country’s longest serving prime minister.

The deal between Proton parent DRB-Hicom and Geely was announced yesterday, with Second Finance Minister Datuk Seri Johari Abdul Ghani saying that Proton would remain a national car because Proton would still have a majority hold of 50.1 per cent.

International newswire Reuters reported that Geely was expected to offer Proton some vehicle technologies in order to grow its sales overseas and to recover some of the global presence Proton had lost in recent years.

Proton reportedly dominated the domestic market by 74 per cent in 1993 at its peak, but saw its market share dwindle to around 15 per cent currently due to low-quality cars, poor after-sales service and tough competition from foreign automakers.

Dr Mahathir said he was certain that Proton would now be sold all over the world.

“It will be like Singapore. Malaysians are proud of this great city-state. If it had not been sold it would be, perhaps, as well developed as Kuala Kedah or Kuala Perlis. Then we cannot be proud of Singapore,” he said.

“Now we can be proud of Proton. With money and superior technology it will compete with Rolls Royce and Bentley. But I cannot be proud of its success. I cannot be proud of the success of something that does not belong to me or my country. Maybe other Malaysians will, but not me,” added the 91-year-old.

Anyway heard it through the grapevine that this is:

Proton Geely’s first model

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Read hear Dr Mahathir’s Chedet